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Syndication

It’s possible, says Perry Bacon, Jr., who believes that only local journalism can sustain democracy where it is most active these days—at the state and municipal levels. On this week’s episode, Bacon talks with Anne-Marie Slaughter about why we need a New York Times in every state and how—in this moment when global digital storytelling is thriving and local papers are shedding thousands of jobs—we might begin to get there.

Direct download: The_Weekly_Wonk_Save_Good_Local_Journalism.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 2:56pm EDT


In this episode, Slaughter talks with historian Khalil Muhammad, director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library, about why the story of police violence against people of color seems to be repeating itself from Rodney King to Trayvon Martin to Michael Brown.

Direct download: The_Weekly_Wonk_History_Is_Happening_Now.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 3:00pm EDT

One week of presidential politics in the spring of 1987 changed political journalism forever and not for the better. So says noted political writer (and alumnus of three presidential campaign trails) Matt Bai in his new book, All the Truth is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid. On this episode, Bai speaks with Schmidt Family Fellow Christopher Leonard to tell us how Gary Hart’s failed presidential bid fundamentally shaped this modern age of political tabloid journalism and what he thinks that means for the future of democracy.

Direct download: The_Weekly_Wonk_How_A_Sex_Scandal_Changed_Democracy.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 10:17am EDT

“The poor” aren’t other people – they’re us. According to recent scholarship, by the time we’re 75 years old, 59 percent of us will fall below the poverty line at some point in our lives. Factoring in related experiences like near-poverty, unemployment, or use of public assistance, that number climbs to a staggering 80 percent. In this episode, Ford Academic Fellow and SUNY-Albany professor Virginia Eubanks talks with New America Managing Editor Fuzz Hogan about the biggest thing we can do to address inequality in this country: recognizing that poverty is a majority issue and something that impacts us all.

Direct download: The_Weekly_Wonk_Poverty_is_a_Majority_Issue.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 9:35am EDT

Promoting diversity in education was one the biggest and most widely practiced ideas of the 20th century. But as Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Daniel P.S. Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History at Harvard, argued in last week’s edition of The Weekly Wonk, diversity isn’t getting us where we need to go to help students who are truly disadvantaged. She has another big idea to make higher education a real pathway to social mobility: directing resources to students who are the first in their families to attend college. In this episode, Slaughter and Brown-Nagin outline the stakes for how reaching out to first-generation students can make college, in the words of Horace Mann, a “great equalizer.”

Direct download: The_Weekly_Wonk_A_New_Kind_of_Campus_Diversity.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:39pm EDT

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